Anti Aging and HGH
HGH Immune Modulation and Weight Loss
 
     
Anti Aging Effects of HGH
Anti Aging and Immune Modulation
Anti Aging and Detoxification
Anti Aging and Weight loss
Anti Aging Articles
Free Anti Aging Reports
Anti Aging Books
Home Page

An Introduction to the Benefits of Fiber

While not considered essential to the body, fiber's presence in our diet may reduce the incidence of obesity, diverticulosis, constipation, hemorrhoids, and varicose veins.

WHAT IS FIBER?
Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not digested by enzymes in the small intestine, where most food is digested and absorbed. While some types of dietary fiber make it through the body undigested, other types are broken down by bacteria in the large intestine. The products of this breakdown include methane, carbon dioxide, water and volatile fatty acids, all of which may cause gas or bloating in some people.

Insoluble vs Soluble Fiber
Dietary fiber can be divided into insoluble and soluble fiber.

The insoluble fibers, including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, come from the walls of plant cells, and are found in whole grains, beans and other plant products. Wheat bran is far and away the richest source of insoluble fiber. Those intolerant to wheat should use oat bran and rice bran. Insoluble fiber speeds the movement of food through the digestive tract and because this fiber absorbs water, it increases fecal bulk and contributes to regularity. It’s primarily these properties that make insoluble fiber in the diet a useful hedge against constipation and diverticulosis. Diets rich in insoluble fiber can prevent or control other digestive disorders, such as colon cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis.

In contrast to insoluble fibers, soluble fibers hold water, but do not increase fecal bulk. That’s because they are completely digested and absorbed in the large intestine. They do not prevent constipation or other digestive disorders, but they do have a vital role to play.
Soluble fibers help control diabetes and hypoglycemia by preventing dramatic swings in blood sugar levels. These fibers tend to form gels which delay the absorption of nutrients from the intestine. While nutrients in foods low in soluble fibers pass quickly from the beginning of the small intestine into the blood, nutrients in high fiber foods are absorbed slowly over the entire length of the small intestine. This slowed absorption makes it easier for diabetics to keep pace with the influx of carbohydrates into the body.

Soluble fibers also lower blood cholesterol levels, causing a decrease in “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and an increase in “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Researchers are unsure how this happens.
Soluble fibers include gums, mucilages, pectins, and storage polysaccharides. Beans, fruits, and oat bran are good sources of soluble fibers, although most plant foods contain both types of fiber.

The average “Western” person eats about 20 grams of dietary fiber per day. It is recommended that people eat 30-40 grams per day.

Fiber
Containing
Foods

Serving Size

Total Fiber (grams)

Soluble Fiber (grams)

Insoluble Fiber (grams)

VEGETABLES

Peas
Parsnips
Potatoes
Broccoli
Zucchini
Squash, summer
Carrots
Tomatoes
Brussel sprouts
Beans,string
Onions
Rutabagas
Beets
Kale greens
Turnips
Asparagus
Eggplant
Radishes
Cauliflower
Beans, sprouted
Cucumber
Lettuce

1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1 small
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup raw
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/2 cup raw
1/2 cup raw
5.2
4.4
3.3
2.6
2.5
2.3
2.2
2.0
1.8
1.7
1.6
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.2
0.9
0.9
0.8
0.5
2.0
0.4
2.2
1.6
1.1
1.1
1.5
0.6
0.7
0.6
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.3
0.7
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.5
0.2
3.2
4.0
1.6
1.0
1.4
1.2
0.7
1.4
1.1
1.1
0.8
0.9
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.9
0.5
0.9
0.6
0.6
0.3
0.3

FRUITS

       

Apple
Blackberries
Pear
Strawberries
Plums
Tangerine
Apricots
Banana
Grapefruit
Peaches
Cherries
Pineapple
Grapes

1 small
1/2 cup
1 small
3/4 cup
2 med
1 med
2 med
1 small
1/2
1 medium
10
1/2 cup
10

3.9
3.7
2.5
2.4
2.3
1.8
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.0
0.9
0.8
0.4

2.3
0.7
0.6
0.9
1.3
1.4
0.9
0.6
0.9
0.5
0 .3
0.2
0.1

1.6
3.0
1.9
1.5
1.0
0.4
0.4
0.7
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.6
0.3

BREADS &
CEREALS

Bran (100 %)
Popcorn
Rye bread
Whole grain bread
Rye wafers
Corn grits
Oats, whole
Graham crackers
Brown rice
French bread
Dinner roll
Egg noodles
Spaghetti
White bread
White rice

1/2 cup*
3 cups
1 slice
1 slice
3
1/2 cup*
1/2 cup*
2
1/2 cup
1 slice
1
1/2 cup*
1/2 cup
1 slice
1/2 cup*

10.0
2.8
2.7
2.7
2.3
1.9
1.6
1.4
1.3
1.0
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.5

0.3
0.8
0.8
0.08
0.06
0.6
0.5
0.04
0
0.4
0.03
0.03
0.02
0.03
0

9.7
2.0
1.9
2.6
2.2
1.3
1.1
1.4
1.3
0.6
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.5

LEGUMES

Kidney beans
White beans
Pinto beans
Lima beans

1/2 cup*
1/2 cup*
1/2 cup*
1/2 cup*

4.5
4.2
3.0
1.4

0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2

4.0
3.8
2.7
1.2

NUTS

Almonds
Peanuts
Walnuts, black
Pecans

10
10
1 tsp.
2

1.0
1.0
0.6
0.5

* Indicates cooked

Meats, milk products, eggs, and fats and oils are not listed in this food fiber survey because they are virtually devoid of fiber content.

Making sure your diet contains adequate amounts of the "right" kind of fiber is an important part of your overall dietary plan.



Main  |  About Dr. Weatherby |  Products  |  FAQs

Diagnostic Services  |  Free Tips  |  Free Articles

Site Index  |  Links  |  Top


Questions of comments about this web page? E-mail us at: Webmaster@AgeWellWithHGH.com
Copyright © 2005 AgeWellWithHGH.com - All Rights Reserved
2693 Takelma Way
Ashland, OR 97520 USA
(541) 482-3779, Fax (541) 488-0323
E-mail: Info@AgeWellWithHGH.com
Click here for info on internet marketing and making money selling your knowledge.

Statements made on this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Information on these pages is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. © 2005 Weatherby & Associates, LLC. All rights reserved